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Gemstone Crystal System Density Hardness Refractive index Treatments
Beryl hexagonal 2.72 7.5-8.9 1.577-1.583 heat, radiation, fracture filling, oiling

 

beryl rough

Color:
All colors, depending on variety.

Clarity: Type I with the exception of emerald
Optic Character:
DR Uniaxial Negative
Cause of Color: Blue (maxixe): unstable color centers; Green: Cr, V, Fe; Red/Pink: Mn; Yellow: Fe
Fluorescence: Generally Inert
Fracture : Concoidal

Luster : Vitreous to resinous
Cleavage :
One direction; indistinct; almost never seen
Durability: Fair

Characteristics for Identification:
Liquid and phase inclusions, Tubular inclusions

Locality:
Brazil, predominantly, but associated with pegmatite dykes worldwide.

Beryl

Beryl is a beryllium aluminum silicate that occurs in every color of the rainbow. When green, it's an emerald. When blue, it's aquamarine. When pink, it's morganite. There is a raspberry red variety found in Utah called Bixbite. Yellow is heliodor and colorless is goshenite. There is a very rare and costly variety termed riesling beryl, that can be described as pale green colour, with a warm golden yellow flash. Beryl had been used as a physician's tool and gazing stone since ancient times. Those beliefs persist today. Beryl is metaphysically attributed with the ability to cure a number of intestinal and stomach ills, such as nausea, ulcers, and seasickness.

Beryl May be confused with:
Labradorite
Quartz
Scapolite
Topaz
Fluorite

Beryl Family
Emerald
Aquamarine
Morganite
Bixbite or Red Beryl
Goshenite
Heliodor
RieslingBeryl
Green Beryl

bixbite
Red beryl from the Wah Wah Mtns.

The Gemology Project: Beryl